MommaMalia Blog: Tales of The Feeding Tube

Posts Tagged ‘Advice

From my experience with Feeding Session Bites, here are a few tips I want to pass on that I have learned. If you have any tips for bite sessions feel free to post your ideas in the comment boxs.

TIP #1: DON’T SWEAT THE SMALL STUFF (AKA: DISTRACTIONS)

Most likely, you will NEVER be able to re-create the environment the Feeding Center provides for Feeding Sessions. You WILL have to deal with multiple distractions at home. So don’t worry about the distractions. Minimize them to the best of your ability and don’t worry if your child does get distracted by things in the home. IT HAPPENS.

*I think I stressed myself out when I first began bite sessions. I tried to re-create the Feeding Center environment at home and quickly realized it was impossible. Distractions were EVERYWHERE!!  If I didn’t relax and give in to the fact, that therapy won’t be as perfect as I had it at the Feeding Center, then I would have made myself absolutely crazy. I didn’t need to put anymore stress on myself and you don’t either. So my advice is…DON’T SWEAT THE SMALL STUFF.

 

Major Distractions at Home I Encountered And How I Dealt With It:

Distraction #1:     Pets

*My cat constantly wants to sit on my lap during bits and this is distracting to my daughter. My dogs like to hang out next to us ALL the time and eat the food my daughter might drop on the floor.

-A way I got around this distraction and you can too, is to put them away in a cage or in a room while you are giving bites.

 

Distraction # 2: Family and Friends

This is a big one. You think your family will cooperate with you…but they may not. Sometimes you family will want to talk to them. Or give attention to your child when your trying to ignore your child. They want to say hello when they come in the door and talk to them when they are trying to chew and swallow. Or bother them while they are eating. Your younger children will try to get your attention. The list goes on and on. Plus, friends can just randomly show up during bites….or call you on the phone…it happens.

1. Talk to your family and friends. Let them know what you are doing. If you have a scheduled time for bites everyday make sure you let people know not to call you during the time. If they are around the bites when it is happening make sure they know NOT to interact or talk to you and your child while bite sessions are happening. (Your child will WANT to get their attention, talk to them or show off for them. As long as your guests and family knows not to give them that attention you child will realize that getting their attention is pointless.)

2. One thing I did when I first started bites at home was make signs letting people know bites we were in session and not to distract us. I hung as sign on the outside door so people who may stop by are aware bites are happening. I also tell my family, in the house, that we are about to do bites and not to bother us.

3. When I babysat my 1 1/2 year old niece I made sure bites where given when she was napping or when she was eating her breakfast in her high chair. I would place her in a place where I could see her  but my daughter could not see her because my daughter would constantly try to get the attention of my niece and my niece would give it to her. Other children in the house are BIG distractions. Do your best to occupy them with toys etc.while your doing bites, if you are alone. If someone is home, have them take care of the little ones while your busy doing bites. If your children are older, try to get bites done before they get home from school. My Step-son is 12 and he still has his moments where he distracts his sister even though he knows not to bother her. It is better if bites are done before he gets home.

4.  Let your family know that they also have a crucial part in Bites and the health of their family member. Their part during therapy is NOT TO DISTRACT you. Tell them that their role is very important and needs to be taken seriously.

5. Don’t exclude your family….include your family. You can involve other children in the house with the therapy sessions by having them help you prep the food and clean up. This will hopefully help the family feel they are involved.  They may not be trained to give the bites but they can help in other ways.

6. Many people will be curious about your therapy sessions. If you feel comfortable enough, allow them to observe you during a session. Of course, make sure stay quietly in the background. By allowing people to observe what you are doing, your friends and family will learn why it is so important that they do not interrupt you or distract your child. Plus, they will be more inclined to understand the importance of therapy and why you are doing it. Surprisingly, especially for the skeptics, they will see that your child is eating better and the bite sessions do work.

Distraction #3: Everything else in the house (Phone, TV, Etc.)

Final thought: All these things I mentioned above, will distract your child. Many things you won’t be able control but you can try to minimize the distractions as much as you can. Administering bites in a quiet closed room is ideal and if you can do it that…then do it. But if you are like me and your main floor with the kitchen, dinning room and living area is a great room where everything is open… then try to minimize the distractions to the best of your ability. Don’t stress out too much. The important thing is that your child eats all of their bites. If this is accomplished…even with distractions…you have achieved your goal and should be proud of that.

CHECK BACK FOR TIP #2:

TIP #2: (USE THE TIME TO YOUR ADVANTAGE. Bites don’t always have to be Tedious)



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